Azure DevOps for CI and CD

Published Nov 1, 2018.
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I set up CI and CD for two of my applications using Azure DevOps. It was quite easy. Setting up the build pipeline is as simple as including a YAML file in your source repository. It then just comes down to knowing how the build YAML schema works. As far as the release (or deployment) pipeline is concerned, though, I could not find a similar method. I had to set it up through the Azure DevOps UI. I don't know if there is some information I am missing, but that would seem to somewhat go against the DevOps principle - you know - infrastructure as code and all.

Anyway, my personal website and blog is a straight forward Razor app based on ASP.NET Core. The build YAML was then very simple:

pool:
  vmImage: 'VS2017-Win2016'

variables:
  buildConfiguration: 'Release'

steps:
- script: |
    dotnet build --configuration $(buildConfiguration)
    dotnet publish --configuration $(buildConfiguration) --output $(Build.BinariesDirectory)/publish
  displayName: 'Build Application'

- task: ArchiveFiles@2
  inputs:
    rootFolderOrFile: '$(Build.BinariesDirectory)/publish' 
    includeRootFolder: false
    archiveType: 'zip'
    archiveFile: '$(Build.ArtifactStagingDirectory)/$(Build.BuildId).zip' 
    replaceExistingArchive: true 
  displayName: 'Zip Build Output'

- task: PublishBuildArtifacts@1
displayName: 'Publish Build Artifacts' 

Things to note here - at first, it was not obvious to me that I need to actually publish the build artifacts for it to be available further down the pipeline. Once I figured that out, though, the built-in task makes this easy. I did have to zip up my folder, though. It's a good idea, anyway, as it's easier than uploading a gazillion files, but I couldn't get it to work without zipping it up. Second, even though I am running the build on a Windows machine, I could just as easily have picked a Linux box since this is .NET Core.

My release pipeline is pretty simple - there are no multiple stages, and it just comes down to one task - the Azure App Service deploy task.

I guess the only difference with my other application, Listor, is that it is a React based SPA with a .NET Core backend. So the build is a little more involved. I therefore found it easier to just write a custom PowerShell script and call that from the build YAML rather than messing around with it in YAML.

$ErrorActionPreference = "Stop"
Push-Location AK.Listor.WebClient
Write-Host "Installing web client dependencies..."
npm install
If ($LastExitCode -Ne 0) { Throw "npm install failed." }
Write-Host "Building web client..."
npm run build
If ($LastExitCode -Ne 0) { Throw "npm run build failed." }
Pop-Location
Write-Host "Deleting existing client files..."
[System.IO.Directory]::GetFiles("AK.Listor\Client", "*.*") | Where-Object {
	[System.IO.Path]::GetFileName($_) -Ne ".gitignore"
} | ForEach-Object {
	$File = [System.IO.Path]::GetFullPath($_)
	[System.IO.File]::Delete($File)
}
[System.IO.Directory]::GetDirectories("AK.Listor\Client") | ForEach-Object {
	$Directory = [System.IO.Path]::GetFullPath($_)
	[System.IO.Directory]::Delete($Directory, $True)
}
Write-Host "Copying new files..."
[System.IO.Directory]::GetFiles("AK.Listor.WebClient\build", "*.*", "AllDirectories") | Where-Object {
	-Not ($_.EndsWith("service-worker.js"))
} | ForEach-Object {
	$SourceFile = [System.IO.Path]::GetFullPath($_)
	$TargetFile = [System.IO.Path]::GetFullPath([System.IO.Path]::Combine("AK.Listor\Client", $_.Substring(26)))
	Write-Host "$SourceFile --> $TargetFile"
	$TargetDirectory = [System.IO.Path]::GetDirectoryName($TargetFile)
	If (-Not [System.IO.Directory]::Exists($TargetDirectory)) {
		[System.IO.Directory]::CreateDirectory($TargetDirectory) | Out-Null
	}
	[System.IO.File]::Copy($SourceFile, $TargetFile, $True) | Out-Null
}
Write-Host "Building application..."
dotnet build
If ($LastExitCode -Ne 0) { Throw "dotnet build failed." }

The build YAML, then is simple enough:

pool:
  vmImage: 'VS2017-Win2016'

variables:
  buildConfiguration: 'Release'

steps:
- script: |
    powershell -F build.ps1
    dotnet publish --configuration $(buildConfiguration) --output $(Build.BinariesDirectory)/publish	
  displayName: 'Run Build Script'

- task: ArchiveFiles@2
  inputs:
    rootFolderOrFile: '$(Build.BinariesDirectory)/publish' 
    includeRootFolder: false
    archiveType: 'zip'
    archiveFile: '$(Build.ArtifactStagingDirectory)/$(Build.BuildId).zip' 
    replaceExistingArchive: true 
  displayName: 'Zip Build Output'

- task: PublishBuildArtifacts@1
displayName: 'Publish Build Artifacts'

The release pipeline, of course, is identical since both these applications are hosted as app services on Azure. Since deploying these applications to production, I have had to make a few changes and this CI/CD pipeline has proved very helpful.



Tagged as  devops azure ci cd azuredevops build release yaml